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vongolazzi:

Fast vs Slow.
Una bella lotta. Gualtiero diventa Fast nel tentativo strampalato di incastrare associazioni azzardate a quelle spugne puzzolenti che rivendono come cibo.SlowFood risponde con paginoni, sempre pronti a pagare profumatamente le loro storielle buonegiuste.
Mi state sul cazzo non poco, uno e due.

vongolazzi:

Fast vs Slow.

Una bella lotta.
Gualtiero diventa Fast nel tentativo strampalato di incastrare associazioni azzardate a quelle spugne puzzolenti che rivendono come cibo.
SlowFood risponde con paginoni, sempre pronti a pagare profumatamente le loro storielle buonegiuste.

Mi state sul cazzo non poco, uno e due.

nprglobalhealth:

From Genes To Fangs: Snake Venom Recipes Remain Mysterious
When a saw-scaled viper sinks its fangs into a person, it isn’t pretty.
Toxins attack the victim’s capillaries. The body launches an immune defense, as it would with an infection. But that takes time — too much time. The venom quickly dissolves the tiny blood vessels, and the body runs out of clotting materials before it can repair them.
"It’s what we call ‘systemic hemorrhage,’ where an individual is essentially bleeding internally and externally," says Nicholas Casewell of the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. “It’s really horrific.”
The World Health Organization estimates that between 20,000 and 94,000 people die from snakebites every year.
Doctors would love to have a universal antivenom that would let them treat any snakebite, regardless of the species.
But research that involved milking six species of deadly snakes suggests that coming up with a universal antidote could be a lot harder than expected, says Casewell, the lead author on a paper out Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
That’s because each snake’s venom is a mixture of toxic proteins, and not all venoms are made the same way.
Snakes create venom in a gland much the same way that humans create spit in salivary glands. It has been thought that genetic differences are behind the wide variety of poisonous concoctions that snakes are capable of making.
Continue reading.
Photo: Saw-scaled vipers may be small, but they pack a nasty venomous punch. This one, Echis carinatus sochureki, was used in a study on snake venom. (Courtesy of Wolfgang Wüster)

nprglobalhealth:

From Genes To Fangs: Snake Venom Recipes Remain Mysterious

When a saw-scaled viper sinks its fangs into a person, it isn’t pretty.

Toxins attack the victim’s capillaries. The body launches an immune defense, as it would with an infection. But that takes time — too much time. The venom quickly dissolves the tiny blood vessels, and the body runs out of clotting materials before it can repair them.

"It’s what we call ‘systemic hemorrhage,’ where an individual is essentially bleeding internally and externally," says Nicholas Casewell of the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. “It’s really horrific.”

The World Health Organization estimates that between 20,000 and 94,000 people die from snakebites every year.

Doctors would love to have a universal antivenom that would let them treat any snakebite, regardless of the species.

But research that involved milking six species of deadly snakes suggests that coming up with a universal antidote could be a lot harder than expected, says Casewell, the lead author on a paper out Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

That’s because each snake’s venom is a mixture of toxic proteins, and not all venoms are made the same way.

Snakes create venom in a gland much the same way that humans create spit in salivary glands. It has been thought that genetic differences are behind the wide variety of poisonous concoctions that snakes are capable of making.

Continue reading.

Photo: Saw-scaled vipers may be small, but they pack a nasty venomous punch. This one, Echis carinatus sochureki, was used in a study on snake venom. (Courtesy of Wolfgang Wüster)

nprglobalhealth:

Phone App Might Predict Manic Episodes In Bipolar Disorder
There are smartphone apps for monitoring your diet, your drugs, even your heart. And now a Michigan psychiatrist is developing an app he hopes doctors will someday use to predict when a manic episode is imminent in patients with bipolar disorder.
People with the disorder alternate between crushing depression and wild manic episodes that come with the dangerous mix of uncontrollable energy and impaired judgment.
There are drugs that can prevent these episodes and allow people with bipolar disorder to live normal lives, according to Dr. Melvin McInnis, a psychiatrist at the University of Michigan Medical Center. But relapses are common.
"We want to be able to detect that well in advance," McInnis says. "The importance of detecting that well in advance is that they reach a point where their insight is compromised, so they don’t feel themselves that anything is wrong."
Early detection would give doctors a chance to adjust a patient’s medications and stave off full-blown manic episodes.
McInnis says researchers have known for some time that when people are experiencing a manic or depressive episode, their speech patterns change. Depressed patients tend to speak slowly, with long pauses, whereas people with a full-blown manic attack tend to speak extremely rapidly, jumping from topic to topic.
"It occurred to me a number of years ago that monitoring speech patterns would be a really powerful way to devise some kind of an approach to have the ability to predict when an episode is imminent," says McInnis.
Continue reading.
Photo: Manic, sad, up, down. Your voice may reveal mood shifts. (iStockphoto)

nprglobalhealth:

Phone App Might Predict Manic Episodes In Bipolar Disorder

There are smartphone apps for monitoring your diet, your drugs, even your heart. And now a Michigan psychiatrist is developing an app he hopes doctors will someday use to predict when a manic episode is imminent in patients with bipolar disorder.

People with the disorder alternate between crushing depression and wild manic episodes that come with the dangerous mix of uncontrollable energy and impaired judgment.

There are drugs that can prevent these episodes and allow people with bipolar disorder to live normal lives, according to Dr. Melvin McInnis, a psychiatrist at the University of Michigan Medical Center. But relapses are common.

"We want to be able to detect that well in advance," McInnis says. "The importance of detecting that well in advance is that they reach a point where their insight is compromised, so they don’t feel themselves that anything is wrong."

Early detection would give doctors a chance to adjust a patient’s medications and stave off full-blown manic episodes.

McInnis says researchers have known for some time that when people are experiencing a manic or depressive episode, their speech patterns change. Depressed patients tend to speak slowly, with long pauses, whereas people with a full-blown manic attack tend to speak extremely rapidly, jumping from topic to topic.

"It occurred to me a number of years ago that monitoring speech patterns would be a really powerful way to devise some kind of an approach to have the ability to predict when an episode is imminent," says McInnis.

Continue reading.

Photo: Manic, sad, up, down. Your voice may reveal mood shifts. (iStockphoto)